New Neurolaw Book — The Punisher’s Brain: The Evolution of Judge and Jury

New Neurolaw Book: The Punisher’s Brain: The Evolution of Judge and Jury

Cambridge University Press recently published The Punisher’s Brain: The Evolution of Judge and Jury, by Morris B. Hoffman, a trial judge for the Second Judicial District of the State of Colorado and member of the Research Network on Law and Neuroscience.

“An unexpected combination of criminal justice and neuroscience, The Punisher’s Brain explores how humans have been hard-wired to penalize wrongdoers and how our modern
institutions of punishment are rooted in our own society.”

More information on The Punisher’s Brain can be found on the publisher’s website: http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/law/socio-legal-studies/punishers-brain-evolution-judge-and-jury?format=HB

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction
1. The most original of original sins
2. Detecting and blaming
3. First-party punishment: conscience and guilt
4. Second-party punishment: retaliation and revenge
5. Third-party punishment: retribution
6. Forgiveness and its signals
7. Delegating punishment
8. Legal dissonances
9. Evaluating some process dissonances
10. Into the gap: evaluating some substantive dissonances
11. Brains punishing brains

Posted by grovese on April 24, 2014 in Books, Criminal Law, Education


Brocher Foundation Call for Proposals

The Brocher Foundation offers to researchers the opportunity to organize a one and a half day multidisciplinary symposium or a two, three or four day multidisciplinary workshop on the ethical, legal and social implications on humankind of recent medical research and new medical technologies at the Broche Centre in Hermance, Switzerland.

To apply or learn more about the events, visit: www.brocher.ch/calls and fill in the online form (only one per project, co applicant/s could be added to the form).

Deadline to apply is May 18, 2014.

      Posted by grovese on April 10, 2014 in Around the Web, Calls for Papers, Conferences and Events, Education


      Neurolaw News

      The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience distributes an e-newsletter, Neurolaw News, which highlights important items of interest for the neurolaw community.  These include notifications of new publications, news of upcoming neurolaw conferences, and the like.  To avoid inbox clutter, distributions occur approximately once every 2 months.

      To subscribe to the newsletter, please visit:  http://www.lawneuro.org/listserv.php

      For the latest edition of Neurolaw News, please visit:  http://www.lawneuro.org/listserv.php#archives

      Posted by grovese on April 1, 2014 in Around the Web, Books, Calls for Papers, Conferences and Events, Education, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Popular Press, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers


      Marshall M. Weinberg Symposium 2014: Neurolaw

      On March 20, 2014 the Marshall M. Weinberg Fund for Philosophy and the Cognitive Sciences at the University of Michigan sponsored Marshall M. Weinberg Symposium 2014: Neurolaw. The 2014 Weinberg Symposium’s focus on the intersection of law and neuroscience fostered an interdisciplinary conversation with presentations from:  Kent Kiehl (University of Mexico), Adina Roskies (Dartmouth College), Francis Shen (University of Minnesota, Research Network Education & Outreach Executive Director), and Elizabeth Loftus (University of California – Irvine).  The four key note speakers were joined by Sarah Buss (University of Michigan), Chandra Sripada (University of Michigan), and Kimberly Thomas (University of Michigan) for a panel that addressed the descriptive and normative dimensions of neurolaw.

      For more information on the Marshall M. Weinberg Fund for Philosophy and the Cognitive Sciences, click here.

      Posted by grovese on March 25, 2014 in Conferences and Events, Education, Neurolaw


      New Coursebook: “Law and Neuroscience”

      The new coursebook “Law and Neuroscience” will be published in May. A brief description of the book – as well as a Sample Chapter, and a Summary Table of Contents – has been posted here:  http://ssrn.com/abstract=2406960.

      Designed for use in both law schools and beyond, the book provides user-friendly introductions, as well as detailed explorations, of the many current and emerging issues at the intersection of law and neuroscience.

      One part of the book lays general foundations by exploring the relationships between law and science generally, and by comparing the views from law and from neuroscience regarding behavior and responsibility. A later part explains the basics of brain structure and function, the methods for investigating each, and both the promise and the limitations of modern neuroscience technologies.

      Core themes the book addresses include new law/neuroscience issues pertaining to: brain injuries, pain and distress, memory, emotions, lie detection, judging, adolescence, addiction, and brain death. Closing units explore current and coming legal issues surrounding cognitive enhancement, brain-machine interfaces, and artificial intelligence. The materials also consider:
      international neurolaw, psychopathy, decision-making, mental health, the aging brain, the veteran’s brain, behavioral genetics, prediction of future dangerousness, and neuroethics.

      Given the scope and nature of coverage, the book is designed to serve both as a coursebook and as a reference text for judges, practicing attorneys, and scholars interested in law and neuroscience.

      Posted by grovese on March 14, 2014 in Books, Education, Neurolaw, Neuroscience


      Will There Be a Neurolaw Revolution?

      Adam J. Kolber (Brooklyn Law School) recently published “Will There Be a Neurolaw Revolution?” in the Indiana Law Journal. The piece can be downloaded here: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2398071

      Abstract: “The central debate in the field of neurolaw has focused on two claims. Joshua Greene and Jonathan Cohen argue that we do not have free will and that advances in neuroscience will eventually lead us to stop blaming people for their actions. Stephen Morse, by contrast, argues that we have free will and that the kind of advances Greene and Cohen envision will not and should not affect the law. I argue that neither side has persuasively made the case for or against a revolution in the way the law treats responsibility. There will, however, be a neurolaw revolution of a different sort. It will not necessarily arise from radical changes in our beliefs about criminal responsibility but from a wave of new brain technologies that will change society and the law in many ways, three of which I describe here: First, as new methods of brain imaging improve our ability to measure distress, the law will ease limitations on recoveries for emotional injuries. Second, as neuroimaging gives us better methods of inferring people’s thoughts, we will have more laws to protect thought privacy but less actual thought privacy. Finally, improvements in artificial intelligence will systematically change how law is written and interpreted.”

      Adam J. Kolber, Will There Be a Neurolaw Revolution? 89 Ind. L.J. 807 (2014).

      Posted by grovese on March 10, 2014 in Free Will, Lie Detection, Neuroethics, Neurolaw


      Neuroethics Job Announcement – Michigan State University

      “The Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences at Michigan State University invites applications for a faculty position in bioethics, with a specialization in neuroethics. This will be a fixed-term (non-tenure track), academic year (9 month) appointment. Rank is open. Salary will be commensurate with experience. The initial term of appointment will be for two years. The appointment will begin August 16, 2014.”

      To learn more about this position, visit: http://www.bioethics.msu.edu/uncategorised?id=243

      Posted by grovese on February 25, 2014 in Education, Neuroethics


      What’s Holding Back American Teenagers?

      Slate recently published an interesting article titled “What’s Holding Back American Teenagers?”  The piece specifically looks at underachievement in American high schools and calls for pushing high schools students “beyond their intellectual comfort zones” during adolescence, which appears to be a period of heightened brain plasticity.  To read the article, visit: http://www.slate.com/articles/life/education/2014/02/high_school_in_america_a_complete_disaster.single.html

      Posted by grovese on February 11, 2014 in Adolescents, Around the Web, Education


      Congratulations to Marcus E. Raichle, Winner of the Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize

      Congratulations to Marcus E. Raichle, Winner of the Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize! The UNC School of Medicine has awarded the 14th Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize to Marcus Raichle, MD, a neurologist from Washington University in St. Louis who has made remarkable research findings about the persistent brain activity of our at-rest minds.”  Marcus E. Raichle is also a Member of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience.

      To read the full prize announcement, visit: http://news.unchealthcare.org/news/2014/january/marcus-raichle-wins-perl-unc-neuroscience-prize

      Posted by grovese on February 1, 2014 in Conferences and Events, Neurolaw in the News, Neuroscience


      Nature Reviews Neuroscience Article series on “Neuroscience and the law”

      Nature Reviews Neuroscience has run an article series on “Neuroscience and the law” that features the work of several Members of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience.  Articles of particular note include:

      Martha J. Farah, J. Benjamin Hutchinson, Elizabeth A. Phelps & Anthony D. Wagner, Functional MRI-based lie detection: scientific and societal challenges, 15(2) Nature Reviews Neuroscience 123(2014).

      Owen D. Jones, Anthony D. Wagner, David L. Faigman & Marcus E. Raichle, Neuroscientists in court, 14(10) Nature Reviews Neuroscience 730 (2013).

      Laurence Steinberg, The influence of neuroscience on US Supreme Court decisions about adolescents’ criminal culpability, 14(7) Nature Reviews Neuroscience 513 (2013).

      To read more about this “Neuroscience and the law” article series, visit http://www.nature.com/nrn/series/neurosciencelaw/index.html

      Posted by grovese on January 23, 2014 in Adolescents, Around the Web, Lie Detection, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers


      Welcome to the Law and Neuroscience Blog

      Welcome to the The Law and Neuroscience Blog--which we have created to provide an on-line forum where the members of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience can share their ideas and interact with not only other researchers but also with the interested public more generally. One of the main goals of the blog is to provide a resource with information about cutting edge research at the cross-roads of neuroscience, law, and philosophy.