Neurolaw News

The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience distributes an e-newsletter, Neurolaw News, which highlights important items of interest for the neurolaw community.  These include notifications of new publications, news of upcoming neurolaw conferences, and the like.  To avoid inbox clutter, distributions occur approximately once every 2 months.

To subscribe to the newsletter, please visit:  http://www.lawneuro.org/listserv.php

For the latest edition of Neurolaw News, please visit:  http://www.lawneuro.org/listserv.php#archives

Posted by grovese on July 2, 2015 in Adolescents, Around the Web, Books, Calls for Papers, Conferences and Events, Criminal Law, Education, Moral and Legal Responsibility, Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Neuroscience, Popular Press, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers


Why Behavioral Economics Isn’t Better, and How it Could Be

A forthcoming publication from Owen Jones is now available via SSRN here: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2504776.

The publication is titled “Why Behavioral Economics Isn’t Better, and How it Could Be” and the abstract reads:

What’s holding Behavioral Economics back?  And what can be done about it?

The fields of Behavioral Economics and Behavioral Law and Economics have each supplied important and useful insights.  But the state of knowledge has changed rapidly across the decades since Tversky and Kahneman first highlighted how people sometimes systematically depart from predictions of the standard expected utility model in neoclassical economics.

Those changes now render it uncomfortably obvious that Behavioral Economics, and those who rely on it, are falling behind with respect to new developments in other disciplines that also bear directly on the very same mysteries of human decision-making.

This chapter identifies four problems for Behavioral Economics.  It explores their causes.  It then suggests and illustrates ways around them, including a path for integrating multi-disciplinary insights.  It provides concrete recommendations that can help to move these important schools of thought forward, in light of developments in other fields.

Owen D. Jones, Why Behavioral Economics Isn’t Better, and How it Could Be , in Research Handbook on Behavioral Law and Economics, J. Teitelbaum & K. Zeiler eds, (forthcoming 2015).

Posted by grovese on June 18, 2015 in Around the Web, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers


Course on neuroscience and law examines how new scientific developments may affect our legal system

A course on “Law and Neuroscience” taught at the University of Pennsylvania was recently highlighted in a story published by the Law School.  Offered this past spring for the
first time ever, “Law and Neuroscience,” was taught by Stephen J. Morse
and Amy Wax.

To read more, visit: https://www.law.upenn.edu/live/news/5561-course-on-neuroscience-and-law-examines-how-new#.VX84nKMo6Ul

Posted by grovese on June 17, 2015 in Around the Web, Education, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News


How Do We Hold a Child’s Mind Accountable?

MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience Member Hon. Morris B.
Hoffman recently wrote a commentary piece via The Marshall Project.  The article is titled “How Do We Hold a Child’s Mind Accountable?” and can be accessed here:  https://www.themarshallproject.org/2015/06/12/how-do-we-hold-a-child-s-mind-accountable

Posted by grovese on June 16, 2015 in Adolescents, Around the Web, Criminal Law, Neurolaw


Teens’ immature brains pose all sorts of dangers

Research conducted by MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience
Members BJ Casey and Larry Steinberg was highlighted in an article titled ”Teens’ immature brains pose all sorts of dangers.”

To read the article, visit: http://articles.philly.com/2015-02-02/news/58679905_1_texts-teenage-brain-camp

Posted by grovese on June 15, 2015 in Adolescents, Around the Web, Criminal Law


New Publication on fMRI-Based Memory Detection

The Journal of Neuroscience has recently published a paper by Melina R. Uncapher, J. Tyler Boyd-Meredith, Tiffany E. Chow, Jesse Rissman, and Anthony D. Wagner titled Goal-Directed
Modulation of Neural Memory Patterns: Implications for fMRI-Based Memory
.

This paper is a deliverable of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience, and a report of this publication can be found here: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2015/june/fmri-memory-trick-060315.html

Citation:
Melina R. Uncapher, J. Tyler Boyd-Meredith, Tiffany E. Chow, Jesse Rissman, & Anthony D. Wagner, Goal-Directed Modulation of Neural Memory Patterns: Implications for fMRI-Based Memory Detection, 35(22) Journal of Neuroscience 8531 (2015).

Posted by grovese on June 9, 2015 in Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers


Neuro-expert testifies for Tsarnaev

The Washington Post recently published an op-ed by Dr. Sally Satel and Prof. Scott O. Lilienfeld about the developments in the Dzohkar Tsarnaev trial.  The piece highlights the use of expert testimony from neuroscientists in this and other criminal cases.

To read the piece, visit: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2015/05/11/neuro-expert-testifies-for-tsarnaev/

Posted by grovese on May 13, 2015 in Adolescents, Around the Web, Criminal Law, Neurolaw, Popular Press, Psychopathy


Neuroscience & Public Policy Seminars

The University of Wisconsin-Madison hosted speaker Dr. Francis X. Shen on April 10, 2015 for the Neuroscience & Public Policy Seminar: The Future of Law and Neuroscience.  On May 10, 2015, Dr. Anthony Wagner spoke at the same seminar series on Memories, Lies, & the Brain: Can Neuroscience Detect Legally Relevant Mental States?

Posted by grovese on May 12, 2015 in Conferences and Events, Lie Detection, Neurolaw


“Obama’s 2013 ‘BRAIN’ initiative results in remote-controlled mice”

Through the use of DREADDs, “designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs,” scientists have been able to manipulate the brain circuitry of lab mice.  These results are a part of President Barack Obama’s 2013 “Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies” initiative.

“The BRAIN initiative as a whole hopes to uncover the sources of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, schizophrenia, depression, PTSD and other still-mysterious brain disorders.”

To read more about this research, visit: http://www.engadget.com/2015/04/30/brain-initiative-first-results/

Posted by grovese on April 30, 2015 in Around the Web, Free Will, Popular Press


Neurolaw News

The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience distributes an e-newsletter, Neurolaw News, which highlights important items of interest for the neurolaw community.  These include notifications of new publications, news of upcoming neurolaw conferences, and the like.  To avoid inbox clutter, distributions occur approximately once every 2 months.

To subscribe to the newsletter, please visit:  http://www.lawneuro.org/listserv.php

For the latest edition of Neurolaw News, please visit:  http://www.lawneuro.org/listserv.php#archives

Posted by grovese on April 22, 2015 in Around the Web, Books, Calls for Papers, Conferences and Events, Criminal Law, Education, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Popular Press, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers


Welcome to the Law and Neuroscience Blog

Welcome to the The Law and Neuroscience Blog--which we have created to provide an on-line forum where the members of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience can share their ideas and interact with not only other researchers but also with the interested public more generally. One of the main goals of the blog is to provide a resource with information about cutting edge research at the cross-roads of neuroscience, law, and philosophy.