Research Network on Law and Neuroscience Blog

Home » Articles posted by grovese

Archives

Author

Call for Papers

The Inaugural Junior Faculty Forum for Law and STEM will be held on October 6-7, 2017 at University of Pennsylvania Law School, Philadelphia, PA. The Northwestern, Penn, and Stanford Law Schools are pleased to announce the creation of a new Junior Faculty Forum dedicated to interdisciplinary scholarship focusing on the intersection of Law and Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics…

Posted on June 7, 2017 in Around the Web, Calls for Papers, Conferences and Events


Article of Interest: The Origins of Cognitive Deficits in Victimized Children

The Origins of Cognitive Deficits in Victimized Children: Implications for Neuroscientists and Clinicians Andrea Danese, M.D., Ph.D., Terrie E. Moffitt, Ph.D., Louise Arseneault, Ph.D., Ben A. Bleiberg, B.S., Perry B. Dinardo, B.A., Stephanie B. Gandelman, B.S., Renate Houts, Ph.D., Antony Ambler, M.Sc., Helen L. Fisher, Ph.D., Richie Poulton, Ph.D., Avshalom Caspi, Ph.D. American Journal of…

Posted on May 14, 2017 in Adolescents, Around the Web


NYT Coverage of Network Research on Young Adult Brains

NYT Coverage of Network Research on Young Adult Brains: The New York Times recently ran a piece titled “A California Court for Young Adults Calls on Science,” which highlights Network research on young adult brains. To read the piece, click here.

Posted on April 20, 2017 in Adolescents, Neurolaw in the News, Popular Press


New Publication: Predicting the Knowledge-Recklessness Distinction in the Human Brain

Iris Vilares, Michael Wesley, Woo-Young Ahn, Richard J. Bonnie, Morris B. Hoffman, Owen D. Jones, Stephen J. Morse, Gideon Yaffe, Terry Lohrenz, & Read Montague, Predicting the Knowledge-Recklessness Distinction in the Human Brain , Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). Abstract:  Criminal convictions require proof that a prohibited act was performed in a…

Posted on April 1, 2017 in Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers


How Should Justice Policy Treat Young Offenders?

Our just-released knowledge brief, How Should Justice Policy Treat Young Offenders?, details the latest research and policy advances related to adolescent and young adult brain development. The justice system in the United States has long recognized that juvenile offenders are not the same as adults, and has tried to incorporate those differences into law and…

Posted on March 1, 2017 in Adolescents, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers


Lie Detection Brief

The Research Network is pleased to announce the release of a new brief, fMRI and Lie Detection. Some studies have reported the ability to detect lies, with a high degree of accuracy, by analyzing brain data acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). But is this new technology ready for its day in court? The…

Posted on December 8, 2016 in Education, Lie Detection, Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers, Uncategorized


Neurolaw News

The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience distributes an e-newsletter, Neurolaw News, which highlights important items of interest for the neurolaw community.  These include notifications of new publications, news of upcoming neurolaw conferences, and the like.  To avoid inbox clutter, distributions occur approximately once every month. To subscribe to the newsletter, please visit: …

Posted on October 20, 2016 in Addiction, Adolescents, Around the Web, Books, Calls for Papers, Conferences and Events, Criminal Law, Education, Lie Detection, Neuroethics, Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Neuroscience, Prediction, Psychopathy, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers, Uncategorized


Network Publication on Third-Party Punishment

A just-published study by a Research Network team used fMRI brain-scanning techniques to identify and dissociate the four different patterns of brain activities involved in: 1.     Evaluating the mental state of a defendant 2.     Evaluating the harm the defendant caused 3.     Integrating mental state and harm information 4.     Deciding a punishment amount The work – published as…

Posted on September 22, 2016 in Around the Web, Criminal Law, Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers, Uncategorized


National Law Journal Op-Ed: “Readying the Legal Community for More Neuroscientific Evidence”

Network Director Owen D. Jones published an op-ed in the September 12 edition of the National Law Journal titled “Readying the Legal Community for More Neuroscientific Evidence: Understanding complex advances in neurolaw can aid the administration of justice.” The op-ed outlines the promise – and pitfalls – of the rapidly expanding field of neurolaw, and why…

Posted on September 13, 2016 in Around the Web, Education, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Uncategorized


Network Releases New Product to Inform Legal, Policy and Justice Advocates about Neurolaw

Interested in learning more about neurolaw but not sure how to approach such a complex topic? Look no further than Law and Neuroscience: What, Why and Where to Begin.  In addition to providing a wealth of resources and information, this brief but important tool offers basic answers to common questions about neurolaw, such as: What…

Posted on September 13, 2016 in Around the Web, Education, Neurolaw, Uncategorized