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Neurolaw News

The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience distributes an e-newsletter, Neurolaw News, which highlights important items of interest for the neurolaw community.  These include notifications of new publications, news of upcoming neurolaw conferences, and the like.  To avoid inbox clutter, distributions occur approximately once every month. To subscribe to the newsletter, please visit: …

Posted on April 19, 2016 in Addiction, Adolescents, Books, Calls for Papers, Conferences and Events, Criminal Law, Education, Free Will, Lie Detection, Mental Illness, Moral and Legal Responsibility, Neuroethics, Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Neuroscience, Popular Press, Prediction, Psychopathy, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers, Uncategorized


Neurolaw News

The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience distributes an e-newsletter, Neurolaw News, which highlights important items of interest for the neurolaw community.  These include notifications of new publications, news of upcoming neurolaw conferences, and the like.  To avoid inbox clutter, distributions occur approximately once every month. To subscribe to the newsletter, please visit: …

Posted on January 18, 2016 in Addiction, Adolescents, Around the Web, Books, Calls for Papers, Conferences and Events, Criminal Law, Education, Free Will, Lie Detection, Mental Illness, Moral and Legal Responsibility, Neuroethics, Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Neuroscience, Popular Press, Prediction, Psychopathy, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers, Uncategorized


Radical Challenges of Neurolaw

MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience Member Stephen J. Morse was recently featured on Case in Point, where he spoke about neurolaw and responsibility. To watch the episode, visit: http://caseinpoint.org/live/news/5340-radical-challenges-of-neurolaw#.VaUoAE3JCUm

Posted on July 14, 2015 in Around the Web, Criminal Law, Free Will, Moral and Legal Responsibility, Neurolaw, Uncategorized


“Obama’s 2013 ‘BRAIN’ initiative results in remote-controlled mice”

Through the use of DREADDs, “designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs,” scientists have been able to manipulate the brain circuitry of lab mice.  These results are a part of President Barack Obama’s 2013 “Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies” initiative. “The BRAIN initiative as a whole hopes to uncover the sources of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, schizophrenia, depression,…

Posted on April 30, 2015 in Around the Web, Free Will, Popular Press, Uncategorized


Call for Papers: Winter 2015 The SciTech Lawyer

Winter 2015 The SciTech Lawyer will focus on current developments in law, science, medicine, and technology that is of professional interest to the members of the American Bar Association Section of Science & Technology Law. We are in need of approximately 6 timely footnoted articles ranging about 2000 words in length, but we also have…

Posted on June 19, 2014 in Calls for Papers, Free Will, Moral and Legal Responsibility, Neuroimaging, Uncategorized


Philosophy and Science of Self-Control Sub-Grant Opportunities

Dr. Alfred Mele of the Florida State University Department of Philosophy is directing The Philosophy and Science of Self-Control project, a new grant project funded by the John Templeton Foundation.  Philosophers and scientists are invited to compete for sub-grants and prizes to support research along two dimensions: the philosophy of self-control and the integrated science…

Posted on June 5, 2014 in Calls for Papers, Free Will, Moral and Legal Responsibility, Uncategorized


Will There Be a Neurolaw Revolution?

Adam J. Kolber (Brooklyn Law School) recently published “Will There Be a Neurolaw Revolution?” in the Indiana Law Journal. The piece can be downloaded here: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2398071 Abstract: “The central debate in the field of neurolaw has focused on two claims. Joshua Greene and Jonathan Cohen argue that we do not have free will and that…

Posted on March 10, 2014 in Free Will, Lie Detection, Neuroethics, Neurolaw, Uncategorized


Taking Aim at Free Will

Kerri SmithNature Scientists think they can prove that free will is an illusion. Philosophers are urging them to think again. Smith, Kerri. (2011), Taking Aim at Free Will. Nature: 1 Sept 2011, 477, 23-25.

Posted on September 6, 2011 in Free Will, Neurolaw, Uncategorized


The Brain on Trial

David M. EaglemanBaylor College of Medicine This article summarizes several difficulties with the current system of criminal justice. It begins with several examples to clarify the relationship between biology and behavior, identifies problems with the assumption that all brains are created equal, argues for a forward-looking justice system, describes new opportunities from neuroscience for rehabilitation,…

Posted on August 5, 2011 in Criminal Law, Free Will, Moral and Legal Responsibility, Neurolaw, Uncategorized


Neuroscientific Challenges to Retributivism

Michael Pardo and Dennis Patterson have a new piece entitled, "Neuroscientific Challenges to Retributivism" that is scheduled to appear in a forthcoming volume that I am editing for Oxford University Press entitled The Future of Punishment. Abstract:      We examine two recent challenges to retribution-based justifications for criminal punishment based on neuroscientific evidence. The first seeks to…

Posted on April 11, 2011 in Criminal Law, Free Will, Moral and Legal Responsibility, Neurolaw, Neuroscience, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers, Uncategorized