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BBC Radio Coverage of Brain-Based Lie Detection

BBC Radio recently covered a story on brain-based lie detection, and mentioned the Maryland murder case, State v. Gary Smith.  To listen to the piece, visit: http://www.lawneuro.org/_resources/MRI%20MIX.mp3 To read more about the case, visit:  http://lawneuro.org/blog/2012/08/debate-on-brain-scans-as-lie-detectors-highlighted-in-maryland-murder-trial/ To read a recent judicial opinion from the case on the use and admissibility of fMRI for truth verification, visit: http://www.lawneuro.org/_resources/pdf/fMRIOpinion.pdf

Posted on October 8, 2012 in Around the Web, Criminal Law, Lie Detection, Neurolaw, Uncategorized


United States v. Semrau

On September 7, 2012, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit affirmed the conviction of Dr. Lorne Semrau on three counts of healthcare fraud.  This case is the first of its kind to address the admissibility of fMRI imaging as lie detection evidence.  The opinion, which can be accessed here http://www.ca6.uscourts.gov/opinions.pdf/12a0312p-06.pdf, cites…

Posted on September 10, 2012 in Criminal Law, Lie Detection, Neurolaw, Uncategorized


Debate on brain scans as lie detectors highlighted in Maryland murder trial

During the ongoing Maryland murder case State v. Gary Smith, Prosecutor John Maloney reached out to top neuroscientists to shed light on the reliability of introducing fMRI brain scans as evidence of the defendant’s truthfulness.  Among those contacted by the prosecution were Hank Greely, Liz Phelps, and MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience…

Posted on August 27, 2012 in Criminal Law, Lie Detection, Neurolaw in the News, Uncategorized


How Neuroscience is Changing the Law

Big Think has a recent piece that incorporates an interview with our own Owen Jones entitled, "How Neuroscience is Changing the Law."

Posted on October 7, 2010 in Lie Detection, Moral and Legal Responsibility, Neuroethics, Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Neuroscience, Uncategorized


Crime Fighting and Mind Reading in TIME

TIME has a recent piece entitled "Fighting Crime by Reading Minds"–which discusses some interesting recent work in neuroscience and its potential for detecting lies, reading minds, and the like.  It's worth the read even if I don't share Rosenfeld's desire to simply "get past all these theoretical arguments."  On my view, side-stepping legitimate moral and…

Posted on August 16, 2010 in Around the Web, Lie Detection, Neuroimaging, Neuroscience, Uncategorized


Pardo and Patterson on Neurolaw

Michael Pardo and Dennis Patterson have a very interesting forthcoming piece in Neuroethics entitled "Minds, Brains, and Norms."  I was fortunate enough to be asked to provide some invited commentary along with Walter Glannon and Carl Craven.  Pardo and Patterson's lead article is now available for preview (see here) along with some of the invited…

Posted on June 30, 2010 in Criminal Law, Lie Detection, Neuroethics, Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Neuroscience, Uncategorized


United States v. Semrau

I have posted several things (see here and here) as of late about the two recent high profile court cases involving the admissibility of neural lie detection.  The case that has garnered the most attention is United States v. Semrau.  The United States Magistrate released his recommendation yesterday.  In short, neural lie detection was deemed…

Posted on June 3, 2010 in Lie Detection, Neuroethics, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Neuroscience, Uncategorized


Miller on Neural Lie Detection in the Courtroom

Greg Miller has recently written three pieces for Science Magazine on neural lie detection in the courtroom: "fMRI Lie Detection Get's Its Day in Court" "fMRI Lie Detection Hearing Ends, Decision Still to Come" "Can Brain Scans Detect Lies" As always, happy reading!

Posted on May 17, 2010 in Lie Detection, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Neuroscience, Popular Press, Uncategorized


Detecting Individual Memories with Neuroimaging

Here is a recent article that readers of this blog will find of interest: Rissman, J., Greely, H., and Wagner, A.D. (2001).  Detecting individual memories through the neural decoding of memory states and past experience.  PNAS. The Stanford University press release can be found here.  Finally, the work has been featured in the popular press…

Posted on May 13, 2010 in Lie Detection, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Neuroscience, Popular Press, Recent Neurolaw-related Papers, Uncategorized


Neural Lie Detection in the News

Here are two recent pieces on neural lie detection: WIRED:  "Lie Detection Brain Scan May Be Used in [US] Court for First Time." NeuroKuz: "Lie Detection and Neurolaw: Do Brain Scans Have a Place in the Courtroom." As always, happy reading!

Posted on May 5, 2010 in Lie Detection, Neuroimaging, Neurolaw, Neurolaw in the News, Uncategorized