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Recent Neurolaw-related Papers Category

New G2i Knowledge Brief

Sep. 27, 2017—New Knowledge Brief from the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience “Individual results may vary.” This phrase pops up frequently in our daily lives, but it is often ignored, underestimated or misunderstood in the courtroom. Using scientific data gathered from large groups to make predictions about individual cases (otherwise known as Group to...

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New Publication: Predicting the Knowledge-Recklessness Distinction in the Human Brain

Apr. 1, 2017—Iris Vilares, Michael Wesley, Woo-Young Ahn, Richard J. Bonnie, Morris B. Hoffman, Owen D. Jones, Stephen J. Morse, Gideon Yaffe, Terry Lohrenz, & Read Montague, Predicting the Knowledge-Recklessness Distinction in the Human Brain , Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). Abstract:  Criminal convictions require proof that a prohibited act was performed in a...

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How Should Justice Policy Treat Young Offenders?

Mar. 1, 2017—Our just-released knowledge brief, How Should Justice Policy Treat Young Offenders?, details the latest research and policy advances related to adolescent and young adult brain development. The justice system in the United States has long recognized that juvenile offenders are not the same as adults, and has tried to incorporate those differences into law and...

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Lie Detection Brief

Dec. 8, 2016—The Research Network is pleased to announce the release of a new brief, fMRI and Lie Detection. Some studies have reported the ability to detect lies, with a high degree of accuracy, by analyzing brain data acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). But is this new technology ready for its day in court? The...

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Neurolaw News

Oct. 20, 2016—The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience distributes an e-newsletter, Neurolaw News, which highlights important items of interest for the neurolaw community.  These include notifications of new publications, news of upcoming neurolaw conferences, and the like.  To avoid inbox clutter, distributions occur approximately once every month. To subscribe to the newsletter, please visit: ...

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Network Publication on Third-Party Punishment

Sep. 22, 2016—A just-published study by a Research Network team used fMRI brain-scanning techniques to identify and dissociate the four different patterns of brain activities involved in: 1.     Evaluating the mental state of a defendant 2.     Evaluating the harm the defendant caused 3.     Integrating mental state and harm information 4.     Deciding a punishment amount The work – published as...

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New York Times Op-Ed: “Don’t Treat Young Adults as Teenagers”

May. 2, 2016—The New York Times recently published an op-ed authored by Laurence Steinberg, Thomas Grisso, Elizabeth S. Scott, and Richard J. Bonnie.  The piece, titled “Don’t Treat Young Adults as Teenagers” addresses the treatment of young adult offenders in the justice system. To read the full op-ed, visit: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/01/opinion/sunday/dont-treat-young-adults-as-teenagers.html http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/01/opinion/sunday/dont-treat-young-adults-as-teenagers.html

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“Neuroscience and the Law: Don’t Rush In”

Apr. 27, 2016—Hon. Jed S. Rakoff recently authored an article via The New York Review of Books titled “Neuroscience and the Law: Don’t Rush In.” To read the full article, visit: http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2016/05/12/neuroscience-and-the-law-dont-rush-in/?sub_key=571a566a569d4

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Neurolaw News

Apr. 19, 2016—The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience distributes an e-newsletter, Neurolaw News, which highlights important items of interest for the neurolaw community.  These include notifications of new publications, news of upcoming neurolaw conferences, and the like.  To avoid inbox clutter, distributions occur approximately once every month. To subscribe to the newsletter, please visit: ...

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When Is an Adolescent an Adult?

Mar. 8, 2016—A team led by Research Network Member BJ Casey recently published an article in Psychological Science titled “When Is an Adolescent an Adult? Assessing Cognitive Control in Emotional and Nonemotional Contexts.” Abstract: An individual is typically considered an adult at age 18, although the age of adulthood varies for different legal and social policies. A...

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