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MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience

News

September 10, 2019

This message brings news about:                                          

A)   Recent Neurolaw Publications
B)   Forthcoming Publications
C)   Audiovisual Publications
D)   In the News
E)   Announcements

 

A. Recent Neurolaw Publications

  1. Ariane Bigenwald & Valerian Chambon, Criminal Responsibility and Neuroscience: No Revolution Yet , 10 Frontiers in Psych. 1406 (2019).
  2. Jostein Rise & Torleif Halkjelsvik, Conceptualizations of Addiction and Moral Responsibility , 10 Frontiers in Psych. 1483 (2019).
  3. Scott D. Kiel-Chisholm, Neural Interface Devices and Negligence , 26(2) Tort L.R. 104 (2019). 
  4. Adrian Raine, Antisocial Personality as a Neurodevelopmental Disorder , 14 Ann. R. Clinical Psychol. 259 (2019).
  5. Adrian Raine, The Neuromodal Theory of Antisocial, Violent, and Psychopathic Behavior , 277 Psychiatry Res. 64 (2018).
  6. Anneli Jefferson & Katrina Sifferd, Are Psycopaths Legally Insane? , 14 Eur. J. Analytic Phil. No. 1 (2018).
  7. Catherine L. Evans, Wonderous Depths: Judging the Mind in the Nineteenth-Century America , 44 Law & Soc. Inquiry 828 (2019).
  8. Katherine Drabiak, Expanding Medication Assisted Treatment is not the Answer: Flaws in the Substance Abuse Treatment Program , 21 DePaul J. Health Care L. 1 (2019).
  9. Katrina Sifferd, Unconscious Mens Rea: Responsibility for Lapses and Minimally Conscious States , 76 Cambridge L.J., Iss. 2, at 441 (2017).
  10. Hazem Zohny, Thomas Douglas, & Julian Savulescu, Biomarkers for the Rich and Dangerous: Why We Ought to Extend Bioprediction and Bioprevention to White-Collar Crime , 13 Crim. L. & Phil. 479 (2019).
  11. Laura Brown, Evaluating Birth Injury Cases , 55 – AUG Trial 46 (2019).
  12. Gordon Ballingrud, Daitlein Jammo, Ideology and Risk Focus: A Preliminary Exploration of the Effect of Judicial Ideology on Risk Focus in Supreme Court Opinion Construction , 96 Denv. L. Rev. 793 (2019).
  13. Dustin Marlan, Beyond Cannabis: Psychedelic Decriminalization and Social Justice , 23 Lewis & Clark L. Rev. 851 (2019).
  14. Renate L.E.P. Reniers, Ulrik R. Beierholm, & Stephen J. Wood, Reward Sensitivity and Behavioral Control: Neuroimaging Evidence for Brain Systems Underlying Risk-Taking Behavior, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 105 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  15. Jean Decety & Jasom M. Cowell, The Social Neuroscience of Empathy and its Relationship to Moral Behavior, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 145 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  16. Jennifer M. C. Vendemia & James M. Nye, The Neuroscience of Deception, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 171 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  17. Heather L. McLernon, Jeremy A. Feiger, Gianni G. Geraci, Gabriel Marmolejo, Alexander J. Roberts, & Robert A. Schug, The Neuroscience of Violent Offending, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 301 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  18. Andreas Mokros, The Neuroscience of Sexual Offending, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 333 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  19. Claire Nee & Stephanos Ioannou, The Neuroscience of Acquisitive/Impulsive Offending, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 359 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  20. Clare S. Allely, Neurobiolgy of Brain Injury and its Link with Violence and Extreme Single and Multiple Homicides, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 385 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  21. Graeme Fairchild & Areti Smaragdi, The Neurobiology of Offending Behavior in Adolescence, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 421 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  22. Fiona Williams & Adam J. Carter, Engaging with Forensic Populations: A Biologically Informed Approach, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 577 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  23. Daniel G. Amen & Kristen Willeumier, Brain Scanning and Therapeutics: How Do You Know Unless You Look? Neuroimaging Guided Treatment in Forensic Settings, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 601 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  24. Bruce D. Perry, Gene Griffin, George Davis, Jay A. Perry, & Robert D. Perry, The Impact of Neglect, Trauma, and Maltreatment on Neurodevelopment: Implications for Juvenile Justice Practice, Programs, and Policy, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 815 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  25. John Matthew Fabian, Forensic Neuropsychology and Violence: Neuroscientific and Legal Implications, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 837 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  26. Leon McRae, Forensic Neuropsychology in the Criminal Court: A Socio-legal Perspective, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 889 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  27. Jessic Pykett, Forensic Neuropsychology: Social, Cultural, and Political Implications, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 917 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  28. Tony Ward & Carolyn E. Wilshire, Explanation in Forensic Neuroscience, in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 939 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  29. Adam J. Carter & Ruth E. Mann, Considerations for the Forensic Practioner in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Forensic Neuroscience 947 (Anthony R. Beech & Adam J. Carter, eds. 2018).
  30. Katrina Sifferd, What Does it Mean to be a Mechanism? Morse, Non-Reductivism, and mental Causation , 11 Crim. L. & Phil. Iss. 1, at 142 (2018).
  31. Katrina Sifferd, Non-Eliminative Reductionism: Not the Theory of the Mind/Body Relationship Some Criminal Law Theorists Want, but the One They Need, in Neurolaw and Responsibility for Action: Concepts, Crimes, and Courts (Cambridge University Press), at 71 (2018).
  32. Michael L. Perlin & Alison J. Lynch, “In the Wasteland of Your Mind”: Criminology, Scientific Discoveries and the Criminal Process , 4 Va. J. Crim. L. 304 (2014).

 

 B Forthcoming Publications

  1. Michael Moore, Addiction and Responsibility , in Palgrave Handbook on Criminal Law and Applied Ethics (Larry Alexander & Kim Ferzan, eds., Palgrave Macmillan) forthcoming 2020).
  2. Katrina Sifferd, Chemical Castration and Other Direct Brain Interventions as Rehabilitative Treatment, in Neuro-Interventions and the Law (N. Vincent & T. Nadelhoffer, eds.) (forthcoming 2019).
  3. Tyler K. Fagan, Katrina Sifferd, & William Hirstein, Juvenile Self-Control and Legal Responsibility: Building a Scalar Standard, in Surrounding Self-Control: The Philosophy and Science of Self-Control (Al Mele, Ed.) (forthcoming 2019).

 

C. Audiovisual Publications

A Student's Guide to Law and Neuroscience
DescriptionLaw and Neuroscience, along with related fields such as Law and Biology and Law and Artificial Intelligence, are becoming increasingly of interest to high school, undergraduate, and graduate students. Yet because these interdisciplinary endeavors are so new, there is a significant lack of available guidance on how best to pursue studies and careers. This online webinar is being provided to help fill that gap, and address students’ most common questions about how to pursue studies and careers at the intersection of law, neuroscience, AI and related fields. 

 

Presenter:  Dr. Francis X. Shen, JD, PhD. Dr. Shen is the Executive Director of the Harvard Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Law, Brain, and Behavior, and the Exec. Dir. of Education and Outreach for the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience. 

 

The video can be found here.

Brain Scans Often Misinterpreted in Criminal Justice System
Radio Interview with Dr. Eyal Aharoni on Top of Mind with Julie Rose. Dr. Aharoni is a postdoctoral research fellow with appointments at The MIND Research Network for Neurodiagnostic Discovery and the University of New Mexico Department of Psychology. In this interview, he discusses the use of brain images in the courtroom, detailing the benefits, drawbacks, and future directions of such evidence. 

The interview can be found here.

D. In the News

Eryn Brown, The Brain, the Criminal and the Courts, KNOWABLE MAGAZINE, Aug. 30, 2019.

Some states of mind, like memory, responsibility and mental maturity, have long been difficult to describe objectively, but neuroscientists are now starting to detect patterns.  How might this knowledge impact the legal system?

Several Members of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience are quoted. 

 

Please find the article in its entirety here.

E. Announcements

Call for Speakers
The Neuroscience Club at the University of South Carolina is looking for speakers whose careers involve the intersection of neuroscience and the law. Our members are interested in learning more about STEM patent/intellectual property law, how neuroscience can be used in public policy, and how neuroscience can impact criminal law. If you are interested, please reach out to our organization president Dabriel Zimmerman at  zimerman@email.sc.edu

 

Neurofutures: Neuroscience and Responsibility
December 3-4, 2019 in Melbourne Australia

Description:  There are a wide range of ways in which neuroscience can invoke responsibility. The identification of differences in brain structure and function among some individuals may potentially have important implications for criminal and moral responsibility in our legal system and other key social institutions. Neuroscience research and the development of new neuro-technologies needs to be undertaken responsibly to ensure we realize its promise while mitigating unintended harms. How we structure the environment or design policies, interventions and social interactions can also influence the sorts of opportunities and behaviors that we are able to engage in. We also need to consider who should be held responsible when things go wrong in neuroscience research or when neuro-technologies result in unexpected side effects. 

For more information about the conference, please follow this link

 

Neurolaw News is produced by The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience , headquartered at Vanderbilt Law School, 131 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37203, under the directorship of Owen D. Jones .

Further Information

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